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Obesogens

If you are eating a healthy diet and exercising and still struggle to lose weight something else to look at would be your level of contact with obesogens. Obesogens are defined as dietary, pharmaceutical, and industrial compounds that may alter metabolic processes and predispose some people to gain weight [1]. Bruce Blumberg, a biology professor at the University of California, Irvine, coined the term “obesogen” in 2006 when he discovered that tin-based compounds known as organotins predisposed laboratory mice to gain weight. [2]
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The idea that chemicals in the environment could be contributing to the obesity epidemic goes back to 2002 when a research paper by Dr. Paula Baily-Hamilton presented evidence from toxicologic studies that went as far back as the 1970‘s showing that low-dose chemical exposures were associated with weight gain in experimental animals.[3]

Some main chemicals to be concerned with are:

Pthalates
Pesticides used in conventionally grown fruits and vegetables
BPA (bisphenol A)
PFOA (perfluorooctanoic acid)


Phthalates are synthetic estrogens, capable of blocking or mimicking natural estrogen in the body. They are used in a few different ways and found in a wide variety of products, which is why it’s one of the most important ones to address. A wide variety of flexible and squeezable plastic, such as toys and shower curtains contain them. It’s also used in thousands of household products from laundry detergent to dish soap, to candles and air fresheners to perfume, body lotion, and shampoos – dryer sheets. If a product has a fragrance it most likely has phthalate in it, since that is how manufacturers affix the scent to it.[4]
Solution: It's hard to eliminate all exposure to phthalates, but you can start by looking for natural skin and laundry products that are fragrance free.

Chemical pesticides found in food and water have been linked to increased BMI in children and insulin resistance in rodents.[5]
Solution: Eat organic fruits and vegetables and drink filtered water.

BPA has been found to increase the size of fat cells. It is in plastics labeled #3 or #7, BPA-lined food cans and cash register receipts.
Solution:

Most people know to avoid using plastic containers labelled #3 or #7.
Minimize canned products except for companies that are not lining their cans with BPA. ( bpa free cans ). Additionally, Kirkland, the Costco brand has some BPA-free cans.
Don't take a receipt unless you need it. Wash your hands after handling receipts.

PFOAs are found in non-stick pans, waterproof clothing, stain resistant carpets, mattresses and microwaveable food items.[6]
Solution:

Use pans that are PFOA free such as cast iron. Here's a list for other PFOA free cookware - PFOA free cookware
PFOA is used in microwaveable food like popcorn and pizza so that the food doesn't stick to the container. Avoid microwaving these types of foods especially. (It's controversial whether microwaves destroy nutrients in food so minimizing microwaved food in general can be a good idea).


Keep in mind that it is impossible to avoid all toxins in our world today and our bodies are pretty good at getting rid of them. Shoot to minimize exposure as best you can without getting too paranoid!


Best,
1. a63, Holtcamp W. Obesogens: An Environmental Link to Obesity. Environmental Health Perspectives. 2012;120(2):a62-a68. doi:10.1289/ehp.120-a62.
2. a64, Holtcamp W. Obesogens: An Environmental Link to Obesity. Environmental Health Perspectives. 2012;120(2):a62-a68. doi:10.1289/ehp.120-a62.
3. a64, Holtcamp W. Obesogens: An Environmental Link to Obesity. Environmental Health Perspectives. 2012;120(2):a62-a68. doi:10.1289/ehp.120-a62.
4. https://liveto110.com/obesogens-chemicals-that-make-you-fat-with-lara-adler/
5. a65, Holtcamp W. Obesogens: An Environmental Link to Obesity. Environmental Health Perspectives. 2012;120(2):a62-a68. doi:10.1289/ehp.120-a62.
5. a66, Holtcamp W. Obesogens: An Environmental Link to Obesity. Environmental Health Perspectives. 2012;120(2):a62-a68. doi:10.1289/ehp.120-a62.